President Obama on Climate Change

President Obama gave an interview on climate change with Dr. Sanjay Gupta after a roundtable discussion on the topic at Howard University. The President stated that his interest in the environment began after enrolling in Occidental College in Los Angeles, and noting the poor quality of the air and health consequences of smog on individuals with respiratory conditions. He then credited the Clean Air Act with helping reduce the prevalence of asthma and other respiratory diseases between 1970 and 2010. Throughout the course of the interview, the President also went on to explain how he considers climate change a public threat, with rising global temperatures increasing the risk of heat stroke and insect-borne diseases. Natural disasters such as hurricanes or droughts, he believes, are making the impact of climate change much more visible to the public. Dr. Gupta states that the President is attempting to re-frame the conversation around climate change to reflect a public health perspective. More >>

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine currently conducts interdisciplinary research on climate change and other environmental health topics. Learn more about Tulane research projects in the Global Environmental Health Sciences department. 

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A Few Tweaks to Amp Up Your Workout

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Change up your exercise routineSpringtime is a great time to revitalize your workout to get the health results you have been aiming for. When it comes to maximizing your work out, variation is key. Engaging in the same workout routine allows your muscles to adapt to that workout and make it easier while burning less calories. This ultimately makes losing weight and maintaining fitness more difficult. A study from the University of Florida also indicates that people who do the same work out are less likely to continue exercising. The same study indicates that to alleviate mental fatigue and boredom, workouts should be modified every two weeks. This change allows people to remain interested in their exercise routine and are thus more likely to follow through with their fitness goals.

Ways to change up your workout include incorporating strength training, changing location, and the intensity of your workout. More >>

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine currently conducts interdisciplinary research on physical activity and other behavioral health topics. Learn more about Tulane research projects in the Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences department. 

Where America drinks most: Study finds binge-drinking trouble spots

XXX COCKTAILS PRET A PORTER.JPGA new study indicates that one’s drinking habits are tied to one’s geographic location. The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health indicates that binge drinking levels are on the rise nationwide, and assessed drinking levels county by county. While the percentage of people who drink is remaining fairly constant, the amounts of alcohol being consumed are increasing among drinkers.

Heavy drinking is defined as more than two drinks per day for men and more than one drink a day for women. Heavy drinking is linked to heart disease, cancer, and liver damage among other health complications. Binge drinking–at least five drinks on one occasion for men and at least four drinks for women–is linked to car crashes, injuries and alcohol poisoning. In general, the study finds the highest rates of problem drinking occur in New England, the Pacific coast and in the northern parts of the West and Midwest.

While regular, moderate drinking is more prevalent in wealthier communities, problem drinking is more prevalent in poorer, more rural communities. More>>

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine currently conducts interdisciplinary research on substance abuse and other behavioral health topics. Learn more about Tulane research projects.